Another South Texas Legend- El Chupacabra

In our part of the country, there are copious amounts of spooky stories, many which are passed down from generation to generation until they become legend.  This week I am discussing a couple of spooky ladies and other crazy lore of South Texas just in time for Halloween and Dia de los Muertos ( Day of the Dead).

Photo courtesy of http://a.abcnews.com/im
Photo courtesy of http://a.abcnews.com/

On a dusty, old ranch in South Texas, as the sun sinks slowly to the west, a seasoned rancher calls it a day.  As he gets ready to head back to the house, he takes a last glimpse of his livestock. The horses are in the stalls for the night, the chickens are in their coops, and the goats are in their pens.  On that starry evening after the rancher hangs his hat for the night, what should be lurking in the shadows of scruffy brush land, but a strange reptilian-canine creature choosing his evening meal.

At daybreak the rancher puts on his hat and heads back out to the pens. What he finds in the lurid morning light is outright devastation. He witnesses that his goats and chickens are all shriveled carcasses sucked dry as if from a vampire. What could have done this? The rancher has seen many strange things happen to his animals over the years, but nothing quite like this.  The rancher shakes his head and mumbles quietly, “¿qué pasó?”

The following is an excerpt from “Legend of the Chupacabra” in Informationanantonio.com:

“The story has many roots and tales from Central and South America, Mexico, Puerto Rico and the Gulf of Mexico regions. The animal is unknown to published works of science or wildlife and has enjoyed a scary reputation in south Texas and San Antonio. Some area residents who claim to have seen the Chupacabra say it is more of a hairless doglike creature with large fangs and teeth. The Chupacabra gives off a smell similar to that of sulfur that remains long after the creature has left the area.”

“Accounts of Chupacabra sightings range from farmers and ranchers to deer hunters that have spotted the monster out of their deer blind while hunting. Looking through binoculars, one hunter described the scary Chupacabra as about three feet tall with black eyes, kangaroo like legs and little to no hair. The creature had huge fangs that resembled a werewolf and walked awkwardly with its head slumped forward like a hunchback. The hunter watched the Chupacabra through binoculars for some time and said he was too petrified to move or pick up his gun. After a few minutes the creature discovered the hunter watching and curiously walked slowly toward the deer blind. After stopping and staring eerily and angrily at the hunter, the Chupacabra turned and quickly disappeared into the brush. The hunter said he wouldn’t even get out of his blind until his hunting buddies picked him up in the ranch truck. He of course had a hard time getting anybody to believe him with such an outlandish monster story when he should have had a hunting story. However, all of the hunters in the truck did smell the distinct odor of sulfur as the drove past where the Chupacabra had first come into view earlier that afternoon. The hunter that had the Chupacabra sighting packed up his thing and left that night never to return to that particular deer lease and says he’ll never hunt alone as long as he lives.”

“The Chupacabra is supposedly responsible for mutilation of cattle and goats throughout the south Texas region. Some believe that cults are responsible for the mutilations while others seem to think it’s some kind of rare disease that attacks small herds of goats and cows. One thing remains for sure, those that claim to have seen the Chupacabra don’t back down from their scary experiences and present them as true stories. Whatever it is, I don’t think the Chupacabra is something I’d like to ever come in contact with.”

Whether it is a goatsucker, vampire, alien, or whatever, it makes for a scary tale during this spooky Halloween – Dia de los Muertos season.

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