Remember Golliad?

At the entrance of Presidio la Bahia
At the entrance of Presidio la Bahia
Presidio la Bahia
Inside the walls of Presidio la Bahia
Inside the La Bahia Catholic Mission
Inside the La Bahia Catholic Mission

While assisting on a field trip with my daughter’s class, I also had the opportunity to learn a little more about coastal Texas history. The town of Golliad is just over an hour away from Corpus Christi.

According to, texas-on-line.com, Golliad of Texas’ oldest towns and is an area was inhabited long before recorded history. “Early Spanish explorers list an Aranama Indian village at the site, then called Santa Dorotea. In 1749, Spain established a mission and, as was custom, a nearby Presidio (fort) for protection,” hence the name Presido La Bahia (the bay).

Just three weeks after the deadly massacre of Texans at the Alamo by Santa Anna, was the horrible massacre of Texans in Golliad. The Texans were completely outnumbered by the Mexican troops.Santa Anna told his troops to execute the prisoners at Golliad, so they were divided into three groups and shot in the field. The victims of these two horrendous massacres became martyrs that led up to victory at Harrisburg in Houston.” [Along with “Remember the Alamo”], “Remember Goliad” became a Texas Revolution battle cry honoring Col. James W. Fannin Jr. and his men who were massacred at Goliad. memorial services at grave of Colonel Fannin and his troops on weekend near March 27.”

With all of the bloodshed at the site, there are many ghost stories that surround the town. According to www.texastravelstop.com , “there are many stories of ghosts among the walls of the Presidio La Bahia. Some say they have heard the cries of children coming from the graves within the courtyard. Others have spotted a monk in a hooded robe roaming the grounds. Legend has it one must be deathly still while in its presence, as it is a mean-spirited apparition.”

Señora de Espíritu Santo de Zúñiga at Golliad State Park
Señora de Espíritu Santo de Zúñiga at Golliad State Park

Haunted or not, Golliad is probably my favorite haunts to learn a little more about Texas history. For one, it is so less commercialized than the Alamo. Also, the town is quaint and has a charm of its own. On the second Saturday of each month, they have Market Days which various crafters and artisians sell their wares. Many of the same folks at the Golliad State Park showing how the pioneers made their necessary materials also sell some of their wares at the Market Days.

Women spinning naturally dyed wool into yarn and later weaving it into cloth.
Women spinning naturally dyed wool into yarn and later weaving it into cloth.
Grinding dried corn into masa for tortillas.
Grinding dried corn into masa for tortillas.
A leather smith shows off a horse tail adornment.
A leather smith shows off a horse tail adornment.
Every citizen of Spain had to know how to make lace so that skill made its way to Mexico and Texas.
Every citizen of Spain had to know how to make lace so that skill made its way to Mexico and Texas.
Metal smiths forging metal into tools and decorative items.
Metal smiths forging metal into tools and decorative items.
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